The Future of Cancer and Collective Intelligence in the Post-Covid World

Ross, K., Keith, N. , Jones, R. , Hanna, C. , Afzal, I., Basra, S., Bell, I., Bennie, M., Berger, A., Bilsland, A., Blyth, K. , Borris, A., Boruc, M., Bradley, J., Caryl, J., Cerniauskaite, U., Cheskin, L., Chiwanda, J., Cooper, J. , Debiasse, K., Fegan, S., Ferguson, C., Halsey, C. , Harris, F., Herceg, Z., Hogg, C., Hush, G., Julien, A., Kameda, R., Keith, A., Kelly, J., Konieczna, Z., Lu, M. Y., Mackay, S., Marinescu-Duca, M., Maxwell, M., McCaffrey, R., McGuire, N., McIntyre, D., Moffat-Kyle, T., Mukherjee, L., O'Friel, A., Perry, M. , Prentice, J., Prosser, Z., Proudfoot, B., Raman, S., Robinson, J. , Smith, A., Stewart, S., Stricevic, M., Teal, G., Thomson, H., Wang, Z., Welisch, G., Wu, O. , Wu, H., Young, E. and Young, S. (2021) The Future of Cancer and Collective Intelligence in the Post-Covid World. [Data Collection]

Collection description

The Future of Cancer and Collective Intelligence in the Post-Covid World project was jointly conceived by the Innovation School at Glasgow School of Art and the Institute of Cancer Sciences at the University of Glasgow.

Graduating year Product Design students from the Innovation School were presented with a challenge-based project to produce a vision of the future based on current trends that relate to the Future of Cancer and Collective Intelligence in the Post-Covid World.

Currently, cancer research and development occur in isolated pockets within stages across the cancer care continuum, which often negatively impacts on the potential for cancer professionals to exchange, integrate and share data, insights and knowledge across the framework.

One of the most significant societal shifts currently taking place within Cancer and Collective Intelligence is the transformation from the siloed clinic point of care model to a seamless continuum of care with greater focus on prevention and early intervention, changing what it means to be someone living with cancer and a professional working within this context. From this new dynamic, emerges the concept of living-labs; transdisciplinary communities of practice involving people working within and living with cancer, capable, through collective intelligence-enabled systems and services, of generating knowledge which can be used locally, and shared globally, to deliver focused innovations across the whole cancer ecosystem.

If collective intelligence holds the potential to truly connect people to people, and people to data, across diverse communities, linking peoples’ lived experiences locally and globally, what kinds of new health and care services might emerge to improve cancer control across the continuum from prevention, detection, treatment and survivorship, and what types of new roles might emerge for citizens, patients and community groups to collaboratively drive these forward with health professionals?

In order to address this challenge, the GSA Innovation School’s final year Product Design students and faculty formed a dynamic community of practice with cancer practitioners and researchers from the Institute of Cancer Sciences at The University of Glasgow and beyond to envisage a 2030 cancer blueprint as a series of future world exhibits, and create the designed products, services and experiences for the people who might live and work within this ecosystem.

This project involved the students working in partnership with an Expert Faculty composed of Cancer Physicians, Cancer Researchers, Social Scientists, Biomedical Engineers, Health Research Specialists, Past Patients, Digital Health Specialists, Design Experts and Government Agencies. The Expert Faculty was assembled from a range of local to global organisations including the University of Glasgow, the Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, the Malawi Ministry of Health and the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC is part of the World Health Organization).

This project asked the students to embark on a speculative design exploration into future experiences of working and living with cancer ten years from now, where advances in collective intelligence have evolved to the extent that new forms and ecosystems of medical practice, cancer care and experiences of living with, through and beyond cancer transform how we interact with each other, with health professionals and the communities around us.

This project was conceived and carried out during the global COVID-19 pandemic. Throughout the project the students positively used this situation to creatively embrace a digital studio practice and innovate around digital and remote access platforms and forums for collaboration, development and engagement. Thus, the designed products, services and experiences for the people who might live and work within the cancer ecosystem are presented as innovative, highly creative, fully immersive, experiential exhibits.

The project was divided into two sections: The first was a collaborative stage based on Future Worlds. The worlds are groups of students working together on specific topics, to establish the context for their project and collaborate on research and development. These were clustered together around ‘Future Working’ and ‘Future Living’ but also joined up across these groups to create pairs of worlds, and in the process generate collective intelligence between the groups. The worlds clustered around ‘Future Working’ are Education, Care and Treatment, Prevention and Detection. Future Worlds clustered around ‘Future Living’ are Personal Wellbeing, Communicating Cancer, Beyond Cancer.

The second stage saw students explore their individual response to their assigned Future World that had been created in the first stage. Each student developed their own research by iteratively creating a design outcome that was appropriate to the Future cancer World. This culminated in each student producing designed products, services or systems and a communication of the future experiences created.

Throughout the project, the results were presented as a series live interactive digitally curated, virtual work-in-progress exhibitions for specific audiences including a special global event to participate in World Cancer Day on the 4th February 2021. An event which allowed the students to actively interact and discuss the project with a global audience of cancer community leaders.

The deposited materials are arranged as follows:
1. Readme files - two readme files relate to tage one and stage two of the project as outlined above.

2. Project overview document - gives a visual overview of the structure and timeline of the project.

3. Stage one data folders - the data folders for stage one of the project are named by the six Future Worlds through which each group explored possible futures.

4. Stage two data folders - the data folders for stage two of the project are named for the individual students who conducted the work and organised by the Future World cluster they worked within.

Keywords: Cancer continuum, Cancer and Collective Intelligence, Cancer Collective Intelligence, Cancer and Design Innovation, Collective intelligence, Cancer care, Cancer Communities, Cancer control, Cancer Prevention, Cancer detection, Cancer Ecosystem, Communicating cancer, Beyond cancer, cancer survivorship, Past-patients, Public and patient participation, Cancer education, Design for health and Wellbeing, Design Strategy, Designing Cancer Systems, Future cancer systems, Wellbeing, Cancer Treatment, Ethnography, Research, Collaborative, Future, Collaborative Futures, Collaborative Learning, Collaborative Teaching, Future experiences, Future Cancer Experiences, Future Living with Cancer, Future Working in Cancer, Future forecasting, Human Centred Design, Ecosystem of Learning, Design innovation, Ecological Design, Innovating Cancer Work, Design speculation, Design for Experience, Design research, co-creation, co-design, Speculative design, Life-centred design, Living and Working with Cancer, Futures thinking, research impact, patient journey, cancer, Future working, Future living, Preferable futures, Teaching Innovation, Transdisciplinary design, open science, Societal impact, pedagogy, pedagogical innovation, hybrid teaching, hybrid learning, hybrid design practice, experiential learning, remote learning, digital and physical, Health service, Healthcare, Intergenerational, Future citizens, COVID-19, post-COVID, Cancer inequalities, Participatory research, Communities of practice, research outputs, knowledge exchange, stakeholder, End-user, data collection, curation, Felt sense, Partnerships, Multidisciplinary, Interdisciplinary, Post-disciplinary, Transdisciplinary
Date Deposited: 01 Jun 2021 15:07
URI: http://researchdata.gla.ac.uk/id/eprint/1148

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Ross, K., Keith, N. , Jones, R. , Hanna, C. , Afzal, I., Basra, S., Bell, I., Bennie, M., Berger, A., Bilsland, A., Blyth, K. , Borris, A., Boruc, M., Bradley, J., Caryl, J., Cerniauskaite, U., Cheskin, L., Chiwanda, J., Cooper, J. , Debiasse, K., Fegan, S., Ferguson, C., Halsey, C. , Harris, F., Herceg, Z., Hogg, C., Hush, G., Julien, A., Kameda, R., Keith, A., Kelly, J., Konieczna, Z., Lu, M. Y., Mackay, S., Marinescu-Duca, M., Maxwell, M., McCaffrey, R., McGuire, N., McIntyre, D., Moffat-Kyle, T., Mukherjee, L., O'Friel, A., Perry, M. , Prentice, J., Prosser, Z., Proudfoot, B., Raman, S., Robinson, J. , Smith, A., Stewart, S., Stricevic, M., Teal, G., Thomson, H., Wang, Z., Welisch, G., Wu, O. , Wu, H., Young, E. and Young, S. (2021); The Future of Cancer and Collective Intelligence in the Post-Covid World

University of Glasgow

DOI: 10.5525/gla.researchdata.1148

Retrieved: 2021-09-21

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