A collaborative approach to exploring the future of Cancer treatment and care in relation to Precision Medicine: A design perspective.

Ross, K., Keith, N. , Aitchison, I., Allbutt, E., Banks, E., Basra, S., Bilsland, A., Charalambous, A., Chapal, C., Drummond, M., Dunipace, S., Erridge, A., Fremin-Besombes, M., Glasspool, R., Hamilton, V., Hanna, C. , Herfurth, L., Humpleby, M., Hush, G., Ivanova, Y., Jones, R. , Kaleta-Pyrek, A., Kalt, L., Kantor, M., Karolak, G., Keith, A., Klink, S., Laing, B., Lister, A., Mallon, E., Mccann, E., McLaughlin, R., Merchant, Z., Mozel, A., Mrozek, O., Painter, C., Paul, J. , Paxton, J., Perry, M. , Prendergast, E., Proudfoot, B., Raina, T., Roberts, F., Safrany, S., Scott, J., Sleight, R., Smith, C., Strain, E., Stricevic, M., Svanera, S., Tobias, E. , Vansteenhouse, H., Williams, N. and Zhang, H. (2019) A collaborative approach to exploring the future of Cancer treatment and care in relation to Precision Medicine: A design perspective. [Data Collection]

Collection description

The Precision Medicine and the Future of Cancer project was jointly conceived by the Innovation School at Glasgow School of Art and the Institute of Cancer Sciences at the University of Glasgow.

Graduating year Product Design students from the Innovation School were presented with a challenge-based project to produce a vision of the future based on current trends that relate to Precision Medicine(PM) and Cancer treatment. This project involved working closely with scientists, clinicians, patients, industry and academic professionals from Glasgow University, staff at Queen Elizabeth University Hospital and Clinical Innovation Zone, staff at Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, Patient Representatives and external design experts from Studio AndThen and GOODD design consultancy. The objective of this project was to investigate, in both analytical and speculative ways, future forms and functions of cancer treatment and care in relation to Precision Medicine, to develop future scenarios and design artefacts, services, and the experiences associated with them.

One of the most significant societal shifts currently taking place within the field of PM is the transformation around what it means to be a patient and a professional working within this context. The public’s role is developing beyond once-passive patients into stakeholders valued within the medical industry and healthcare sector for their participation in clinical trials, and contribution towards policy-making and decision-making committees. This new dynamic is changing the traditional patient-doctor relationship and challenging the hegemony of medical practice at an institutional level. The impetus for this shift is relentless technological acceleration and increased scientific research, in particular driven by advances in PM.

This project asked students to consider what will happen in a cancer landscape ten years from now, where PM has evolved to the extent that new forms of medical practice, cancer treatment and care transform how we interact with each other, with professionals and the world around us. The brief gave students the opportunity to reflect on the underlying complexities regarding the future of health, technological acceleration, post-capitalism and human agency, to envision a future world context, develop it as an experiential exhibit, and produce the designed products, services and experiences for the people who might live and work within it.

The project was divided into two sections: The first was a collaborative stage where groups of students were assigned a specific area of focus from Social, Technological, Economic, Ethical, Educational, Political, Legal, Ecological [STEEEPLE]. These groups focused on researching and exploring their specific lenses and gathering as much information and understanding while working with external experts to further their knowledge. This group stage culminated in an exhibition of the collaborative understanding of what the future could look like in 10 years from now, after exploring the possible consequences of current actions.

The second stage saw students explore their individual response to the world that had been defined in the first stage. Each student had their own response to the research by iteratively creating a design outcome that was appropriate to the subject matter. This culminated in each student having created a design product/service/experience relating to the future scenario. A full report (Project Process Journal [PPJ]) is included within the repository of each student which breaks down their process of designing and the outcome they have designed.

The project aims to tackle the emerging possibilities where medical professionals and design can collaborate, to create a future where forms of medical practice are more preventative and are more appropriate for an aging population now and into the future.

The deposited materials are arranged as follows:
Readme files - two readme files relate to stage one and stage two of the project as outlined above.
Overview poster - gives a visual overview of the structure and timeline of the project.
Data folders - the data folders for stage one of the project are named for the lens through which each group viewed possible futures. The data folders for stage two of the project are named for the individual students who conducted the work.

Keywords: Precision Medicine, Cancer Treatment, Social, Technological, Economic, Ethical, Educational, Political, Legal, Ecological, Ethnography, Research, Collaborative, Future, Future forecasting, Human Centred Design, co-creation, co-design, Futures thinking, research impact, patient journey, cancer
College / School: College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Cancer Sciences
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Cancer Sciences > Clinical Trials Unit
Date Deposited: 08 Aug 2019 15:26
URI: http://researchdata.gla.ac.uk/id/eprint/843

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Ross, K., Keith, N. , Aitchison, I., Allbutt, E., Banks, E., Basra, S., Bilsland, A., Charalambous, A., Chapal, C., Drummond, M., Dunipace, S., Erridge, A., Fremin-Besombes, M., Glasspool, R., Hamilton, V., Hanna, C. , Herfurth, L., Humpleby, M., Hush, G., Ivanova, Y., Jones, R. , Kaleta-Pyrek, A., Kalt, L., Kantor, M., Karolak, G., Keith, A., Klink, S., Laing, B., Lister, A., Mallon, E., Mccann, E., McLaughlin, R., Merchant, Z., Mozel, A., Mrozek, O., Painter, C., Paul, J. , Paxton, J., Perry, M. , Prendergast, E., Proudfoot, B., Raina, T., Roberts, F., Safrany, S., Scott, J., Sleight, R., Smith, C., Strain, E., Stricevic, M., Svanera, S., Tobias, E. , Vansteenhouse, H., Williams, N. and Zhang, H. (2019); A collaborative approach to exploring the future of Cancer treatment and care in relation to Precision Medicine: A design perspective.

University of Glasgow

DOI: 10.5525/gla.researchdata.843

Retrieved: 2020-04-07

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